8th Grade Astronomy Dodecahedrons 2

DodecahedronsJonah Vu

Students from Mrs. Cleckler’s and Mrs. Ibbetson’s science class recently completed one of their last projects of the year, a dodecahedron! A dodecahedron is a three-dimensional polyhedron with twelve flat faces, and eight graders were required to fill up each side with researched information on space.

The side requirements for the dodecahedron asked for the student’s name and period on the first side. Then, students chose a famous astronomer and used the second and third side to do an in-depth analysis of them and their accomplishments. Another two slides were filled by an examination of an influential telescope of choice.

Sides six through ten were devoted entirely to some sort of obscure astronomical object anywhere in space. Some examples of what students picked are specific moons, comets, asteroids, galaxies, and nebulae. The prompt called for information on the appearance, composition, and movement of the astronomical object, as well as how it was found or photographed. Students were also asked for the location of the object, its distance from the Sun, and how long would it take to travel there by spacecraft (hypothetically, not realistically).

The prompt called for information on the appearance, composition, and movement of the astronomical object, as well as how it was found or photographed. Students were also asked for the location of the object, its distance from the Sun, and how long would it take to travel there by spacecraft (hypothetically, not realistically).

Out of the eight planets in the solar system, students were allowed to choose one and do an additional evaluation of it. They researched some typical facts about the planet, such as how long its years are, what it’s made of, the quality of its atmosphere (or lack of), and how it got its name. The directions also necessitated the mass, volume, and diameter of the planet in relation to the Earth’s.

Finally, slide twelve was a standard, informational paragraph on the Sun, noting its layers, temperature, age, and composition. Students were expected to hypothesize what would happen to the Sun in the future and what would happen if the Earth gradually moved away from the Sun.

The entire dodecahedron had nine images on twelve sides, and points were taken away if the project was handwritten instead of typed. Assembly of the dodecahedron was fun and difficult at the same time because many had never built such a complex 3D figure before.

This sixty point assignment was due on May 19 or 20, depending on the block schedule of the science students, but all were given over two hours of class time to work. In addition to turning in the project, there will also be fifteen points graded on a student presentation of three sides.

2 comments

  1. I absolutely despised this project… First, the social studies film, next, the stop motions, (not to mention work outside of school) and now this!? “Hey, You know what would be great? If we dumped ANOTHER time-consuming project on the 8th graders!!!” Great idea! Honestly… maybe if they did this at the beginning of the year, that would be okay, but, honestly? Terrible idea. No offense.

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  2. I agree with Jalon. These projects can bring down our grades a whole lot and we only have 2 weeks before school is over. I wish they didn’t make these decisions, but the students must bear with it and try their hardest not to fail because of these poorly timed projects.

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